World War II Resistance Drama returns

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Local group to perform readers theater rendition of Things We Couldn’t Say

Orange City, IA, June 9, 2016– A story that thrilled local audiences two decades ago will return to the Knight Center at Unity Christian High, Orange City, when a group of local actors will perform the readers theater version of Things We Couldn’t Say.

The story of Diet Eman, a Holocaust survivor and resistance fighter in the Netherlands during the Nazi occupation, is basically a love story set against the great human tragedy of World War II. A quarter century ago Ms. Eman sought the services of Alton writer James Schaap to help her write her story. Things We Couldn’t Say has thousands of beloved readers around the world and has been published in several versions and languages.

When the book was published in 1994, Schaap wrote the script, and the play was performed locally and nationally. Ms. Eman visited many area schools back then to tell her story of intrigue and danger, of courage and faith.

Janie Van Dyke, who is directing the performance, was herself part of some of those performances twenty years ago. Van Dyke, who teaches English at Unity, chose to do Things We Couldn’t Say as an experiment because she knew the script could be done without major costuming requirements or elaborate stage design.

“The story is so powerful,” Van Dyke says, “that we still have trouble not getting emotional just reading through it.” She has her own designs on a summer theater program at the Knight Center. “I felt it was important for this first attempt to do something really good and relatively easy to produce.”

James Schaap plays a minor role in the production, introducing the story before Diet Eman (Leanne Bonnekroy) begins to tell it. Soon, Diet’s own younger self (Teresa Ter Haar) appears, along with Hein Sietsma (Jason Alons), the resistance fighter she’d planned to marry. Greg Steggerda and Tom Hydeen play Nazi officials and guards.

Van Dyke is not the only member of the cast to return to the script. Teresa Ter Haar, who teaches theater at Dordt, was a member of the first cast back in 1994, when she was a senior at Calvin College, Grand Rapids Michigan. “It’s quite amazing how much more I feel the story today, now that I’m older,” she says.

Performances are scheduled at 7:30, for Friday, June 24, and Saturday, June 25, at the Knight Center. General admission is $5.00. The intensity of the Eman story makes it wise not to take small children.

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If you would like more information about this topic, please contact Janie Van Dyke at 712 441 3228 or email at jvandyke@unity.pvt.k12.ia.us; alternatively, you may contact James Schaap at 712 441 1125 or email at jschaap@dordt.edu.

 

Orange City Fifth Among Nation’s Top Christian College Towns

Orange City, home to Northwestern College, has been ranked fifth among the nation’s top 10 Christian college towns by CollegeandSeminary.com. The website’s rankings are based on how well a city that houses a Christian college offers students big-city amenities with a small-town feel.

“Northwestern College has played an integral role in the development of Orange City,” says Mayor Deb De Haan. “The residents enjoy a healthy ‘town and gown’ relationship that exists between the city and the college, and they recognize that many of the cultural and entertainment amenities available to them are a result of Northwestern being located here.”

The website’s ranking is based around both the on-campus atmosphere and the off-campus amenities located in the town surrounding a college or university. According to the website, “Most of the colleges that made the list are big cities with small-town charms. Let me be clear: Orange City is a small town with small- town charms.” It goes on to say, “It’s very Dutch, very clean and very safe. Students walk to the movies, to the coffee shop, and to Pizza Ranch. It’s a community rooted in family, which helps make it feel like home.”

In addition to amenities, community members and local churches also act as a benefit to Northwestern students. Local residents often welcome college students into their homes for meals, holiday celebrations and free laundry service.

“Among the many benefits Northwestern students and employees receive in Orange City are a safe environment and a vibrant local economy in the middle of America’s heartland,” says Mark Bloemendaal, Northwestern’s dean of enrollment and marketing. “Significant interaction between local residents and college students make it a home-away-from-home that results in lifelong relationships that cross generations, time zones and even continents.”

Orange City has been called one of the cleanest towns in America. With a population of around 6,000, it boasts a five-screen movie theatre, 18-hole golf course and restaurants ranging from coffee houses to fast-food chains and one-of-a-kind eateries. Orange City has also been ranked as the best town in Iowa to raise a family by Niche rankings (the 43rd best in the nation), and one of the 100 best small towns in the United States by livability.com.

The rankings, at http://tinyurl.com/pr8h6cz, list Nashville, Tenn., first; followed by Grand Rapids, Mich., at second. Other cities in the top 10 include Seattle and San Diego.

welcome back students & faculty

 

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The cities of Orange City and Alton and all of our citizens are happy to welcome you to our schools and our communities this fall. Our merchants are ready to serve you with the finest merchandise and dependable service to help make your school year an enjoyable experience. Stop in to visit with us, we enjoy meeting you!

Caution: Our children will be walking and bicycling to and from school on sidewalks and painted, designated walkways. Please drive with care when entering our school route zones. Parents, please instruct your children to the safest and best routes to travel to school.

Northwestern College to host conference on communication Aug. 10-12

The Northwestern Leadership series conference, Courageous Communication, will offer proven strategies for employing the power of language to speak and lead better.

A professional conference focusing on effective communication will be held on the campus of Northwestern College Aug. 10 through 12. The Northwestern Leadership Series conference, titled Courageous Communication, will offer proven strategies for employing the power of language to speak and lead better. The conference is being sponsored by Northwestern College’s Graduate School and the college’s Franken Leadership Center in partnership with Pizza Ranch. Sessions will cover successful negotiating; conflict resolution; crafting powerful presentations; messaging that motivates; and using technology and remote communication to expand your business, brand and ability to get everyone on the same page. Keynote speakers include former news anchor Kristie VerMulm. Among the other speakers will be Dr. Chris Gurrie, a communication scholar at the University of Tampa; Paul Ten Haken, president of Click Rain, a digital marketing firm in Sioux Falls; Scott Peterson, CEO of Interstates Companies; Dr. Rick Melmer, South Dakota’s former secretary of education; and Angela Ten Clay, communication manager for Wellmark Blue Cross/Blue Shield and president of the Iowa chapter of the American Marketing Association. Sessions will also be led by three college presidents: Greg Christy of Northwestern College, Kurt Dykstra of Trinity Christian College and Dr. Alethea Stubbe of Northwest Iowa Community College. Conference registration is open until July 27; the Courageous Communication fee is $400 until July 15 and $450 starting July 16. Northwestern College alumni can attend the conference at a discounted rate of $350. Overnight accommodations are separate from the conference fee and are being provided by the Hampton Inn, Orange City, and the Holiday Inn Express, Sioux Center. Visit www.nwciowa.edu/lead for conference details and to register.

Northwestern College Calendar of Events: March 2014

Northwestern College

14                    Preview Day, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Northwestern College

A cappella Choir home concert, 7:30 p.m., Christ Chapel, Northwestern College

17–21              Senior art exhibit by Jeriah Dunk, Te Paske Gallery, Korver Visual Arts Center, Northwestern

College

 

20                    LifeLight Reset Tour concert, featuring Remedy Drive, VOTA, Manic Drive, Jeremy

Vanderloop and speaker Josh Brewer, 7 p.m., Christ Chapel, Northwestern College

 

21–22              World Premiere Festival, 7:30 p.m., Allen Black Box Theatre, Northwestern College

 

24–28              Senior art exhibit by Kayla Vetter, Te Paske Gallery, Korver Visual Arts Center, Northwestern College

 

28                    Concert by Baladino, a folk group from Israel, 7:30 p.m., Christ Chapel, Northwestern College

 

29                    Ethnic Fair, 5 p.m., Rowenhorst Student Center Gym, Northwestern College

 

31–April 4         Senior art exhibit by Lindsey Vander Velde, Te Paske Gallery, Korver Visual Arts Center, Northwestern
College